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Shark Schema Chart: Teaching with Intention!


Teaching with Intention by Debbie Miller is one of my all time favorite professional development books.  When I read this book in 2008, it really helped me define my teaching philosophy and think about WHAT I do as a teacher and WHY I do it.  When you do activities with your students, it's important to be able to define their purpose and to be able to explain why you think it's important.       I LOVE this book, and I've blogged about it MANY times over the last five years.  
One of my favorite things that I took away after reading it was the idea for creating Schema charts.
In the book Debbie used file folders for her schema charts, but for Kindergarten and First Grade students I thought that it was important that the charts were large enough that the students can see them and refer to them on a regular basis.  
The picture above shows what a schema chart looks like after we've worked on a topic for several days.  In the pictures that follow I want to take you step by step through the process I use when I do these with my students.  The following are my words, not Debbie Miller's, but I hope that I can do her work justice.  :)

DAY ONE:  Before I read any books or tell them any facts about a particular topic I first record their schema.  It would sound something like this,  "Boys and Girls, this week we are going to be learning all about sharks.  Before we start I want to find out what schema you may already have about sharks.  Who would like to share?"  As the students share their schema, I record them all on the same colored post-it note.  EVEN if someone shares something that I know isn't correct, I still record it.  
I want ALL students to know that their thinking and learning is valued.  

As we are reading and learning new information throughout the week, we add it to the chart using a different colored post-it note.  We continuously go over the schema we recorded to make sure it is correct.  Sometimes we tag the new learning to our schema as you can see in the above picture...

and sometimes we find out that there were some misconceptions. When we find a misconception, we talk about why it wasn't correct information and move it to the misconceptions box.   NOTE:  I NEVER point out the misconceptions as we read and learn together through discussions the students are the ones who point them out.  The first few times we do these in the fall, I make sure that MY schema goes in the misconceptions box first.  That way students understand that we are all still learning, even the teacher.  You never want to a child to feel like they are wrong or they will stop participating.  

You can see that the chart is added to throughout the week.  When we added the misconceptions we talked about them.  For example,  "Why is it a misconception that sharks eat people?" and we would discuss that sharks sometimes bite people who are swimming in the water because they mistake them for food.  


When used correctly these charts are powerful learning tools!  


This is one of those books that you will read over and over and mark up the pages.
You can see my book below.  Tons of sticky notes, highlighting and writing in the margins!  
Did I mention that I love this book?  If you've read it I'd love to hear your thoughts.  




Enjoy the rest of your week! For some of you Summer is almost here!! 

Guiding Readers, Curriculum Maps and FREE five-day lesson plan



We have a whole series of Guiding Readers units out.  The units cover phonemic awareness, phonics, and Comprehension skills.  Here are a few pictures that Stephanie Stewart shared with me from the April unit.





Sequencing the picture cards for the story, Piggie Pie.
Checking her notebook with the class chart to see if her pictures are in the correct order.



Writing about their favorite part of the story.


The writing activities are available in regular paper format and Flip Flap format for those who choose to put the pages in a journal.  



This little sweetie sequenced the story in his reading journal.



These lessons focus on one read aloud book for five days, so that you can really dig deep and work on a variety of comprehension skills.  This is what our five-day plan for Piggie Pie looks like.


Our systematic word work makes it easy for even the littlest learners to tackle and learn some of the higher level phonics chunks that they will encounter in the texts they read.  We've included large pocket chart pieces for many of the word work components so that there is flexibility in how it is introduced and taught.



You can break up the components and do them at various times of the day.
For example, the word work portion could be done in the morning or as a warm up in your Guided Reading groups.


Lesson Planning is a snap and if you're out sick a sub can easily follow these plans.  



Click on the cover below to view the May unit and read the feedback.
So far, we have the units completed for January -May.
June-December will be finished soon!


If you're curious about the year long word work and list of books we will be using in the units, you can check out our FREE Curriculum maps by clicking on the images below.




Click HERE to download the five day lesson plan.  


Thank YOU Sale


  Thank you Doodle Bug Teaching for the graphic!
Happy Teacher Appreciation Week! 
Teachers Pay Teachers is having their annual Teacher Appreciation sitewide sale on 
Tuesday and Wednesday 
and everything in my store is on sale 20 % off, and you can save an additional 10% off by entering the code,  ThankYou
when you check out.   
Here are a few suggestions to help you get through the end of the year.



and my NEW Ocean Animals unit


My sweet friend, Deedee Wills tested this unit out for me last week.


Reading my Shark informational text on the big screen.


Using the Sharks True or False? sheet to write their own informational text.  

                                                       Bulletin board of the shark craft and writing.

  
My Chit Chat charts can be used on for Interactive Writing on the Smartboard, OR you can write the messages on a large chart like Deedee did. 


Student version

This Ocean Animals unit is packed full of learning and fun!



We have a whole series of Guiding Readers units out.  The units cover phonemic awareness, phonics, and Comprehension skills.  Here are a few pictures that Stephanie Stewart shared with me from the April unit.





sequencing the picture cards for the story, Piggie Pie


Checking her notebook with the class chart to see if her pictures are in the correct order.



Writing about their favorite part.  


The writing activities are available in regular paper format and Flip Flap format for those who choose to put the pages in a journal.  




Sequencing the story in his reading journal

Click on the covers to view the units and read the feedback.
These units are on sale for 20% off plus an additional 10% when you use the code, THANKYOU









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